NSFW – New PSA Shows Porn Star Gives Parents ‘the Talk’

This is a bit unusual, our first potentially NSFW post. Is it really NSFW, probably not, but it could be embarassing to have it playing on your desktop.

In the digital age, kids as young as 9-years-old are turning to hardcore online porn for their sex education – and most parents are unaware of the new reality.

Give The Talk is a not-for-profit campaign that gets real about porn and sex-ed and empowers parents to “give the talk” – ironically, through porn stars. The project is the lovechild of two female creatives Celine Faledam and Rachel Guest from agency Mistress Creative.

Rachel Guest said:

“Porn has changed in the digital age. We’re not here to demonize porn, but it’s clear the content is more accessible and increasingly graphic and even violent (especially toward women). As adults, we’ve seen some of the effects of porn on our own sex lives, but it’s even more disturbing when you think about hardcord online porn being a 9-year-old’s first exposure to sex. And a lot of parents don’t realize we need to start that conversation that young. A simple chat from parent to child can give kids the ability to critique the content they’re inevitably going to see.

Our mission is that  every parent see this initiative and feel empowered and equipped to talk to their child. Because we believe the next generation deserves better, deserve to make more informed decisions about sex so that they can have healthy, respectful and happy sexual experiences.”

The campaign launches with a provocative PSA from porn actress Monique Alexander that highlights the curent sex-ed landscape. At the end of the film, parents are driven to amaze.org a not-for-profit  organization that aims to make sex-ed engaging, informative and less weird for very young adolescents and parents.

Celine Faledam, said:

“There’s a lot of stigma around porn. But we’ve got to start speaking about it for our girls and our boys. We want kids to have healthy, consensual and pleasurable sex lives. And to do that, it’s on us as caring adults to normalize sex, integrate porn into the sex-ed conversation, because the truth is, currently we’re not supporting kids and parents in the best way possible. ”

The campaign includes influencer outreach with a strong focus on Mommy Bloggers and new parents.

The campaign launched on June 1st, International Children’s Day.

Celine and Rached describe their project:

“As women, we’ve already seen the way porn has shaped our personal sexual relations. So when attending  a women’s conference last year, and hearing a mother speak firsthand about the way porn was  influencing her adolescent son, we were very impacted and began to dive into the issue. The more we researched the more we found.

Along our journey we consistently heard from parents, psychologists, family doctors, and kids themselves about the varying ways porn is negatively influencing their sexual expectations, self esteem, and personal connections. It seemed like most parents understood that their kid might see some softcore porn in their teen years but very few have realized just how much porn consumption has changed or how it is impacting kids’ gender identity and interpersonal relationships.

It was clear that parents need to chat to their children about porn but first they have to know about it. Coming from an advertising background, we felt we had the ability to get that message out there.”

“The effects of hardcore online porn are just beginning to manifest. And while, some people are championing its impact on adults, there’s a huge gap around porn and sex education.

We’re not here to demonize porn. But the reality is there’s not a lot of tools or information for parents to help children critique the things they’ll inevitably see online. As hardcore porn, sex-education policy or curriculum is not going to change any time soon, our best hope is for parents to pick up the cause.  And to do that, we need to normalize this issue,  we need to speak about sex and porn more instead of less. It is our hope that in 2017, as responsible adults and parents we can remove the stigma and shift the conversation without shame or blame; and that the dialogue remains open over the course of a child’s adolescence. Otherwise, we’ll continue to bury our heads in the sand and let the porn industry dictate our kids’ sex lives.”

Links

https://mistress.agency/

http://amaze.org/

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