Girls Who Code Celebrates Day of the Girl with First-Ever Global #MarchForSisterhood

Girls Who Code launched the first-ever all-digital global march for girls, by girls, and about girls: the #MarchForSisterhood. Bridging the gap between “IRL” and “URL” activism, the #MarchForSisterhood invites people around the world to record themselves marching for causes they are passionate about and post them to social media.

Since Girls Who Code announced the #MarchForSisterhood on September 16th, thousands have pledged to participate today to make their voices heard on issues such as climate change, healthcare, gender equity, tech education, racial justice, LGBTQ rights, gun control and more.

On TikTok, the world’s leading destination for short-form mobile videos and a partner of the #MarchForSisterhood, nearly 250,000 people have engaged with the march, posting videos under the #marchforsisterhood and generating more than 500 million views.

Girls Who Code aims for #MarchForSisterhood to be the biggest online march in history – with girls from across the globe all marching together online.

“Today, girls – and all who identify as girls – are more connected to one another than ever before,” the #MarchForSisterhood manifesto states. “Our ideas and dreams spread quickly from one smartphone to another, allowing us to share our lives with another girl, family, and community a world away.”

The #MarchForSisterhood was organized in part by Team Sisterhood, a diverse team of 100 young women across a variety of issues impacting their communities. Included in this group are young changemakers, activists, community leaders, and organizers including Deja Foxx, Irsa Hirsi, Jenna Ortega, Ava Phillippe, and more.

“Technology is changing everything about the way we live and work – and now, with #MarchForSisterhood our girls are proving that it’s changing everything about activism,” said Girls Who Code founder and CEO Reshma Saujani. “Today, millions of girls came together to speak out for what they believe in, and to show the world – once again – that they are not just the leaders of tomorrow, they’re the leaders of today.”

Refinery29, a leading media and entertainment destination for young women, is the exclusive media partner for the #MarchForSisterhood. Today, in honor of the Day of the Girl, they will host a homepage takeover featuring Team Sisterhood and the world premiere of the campaign video. For the past week, the site has featured personal essays written by Team Sisterhood members about their activism and why they are marching today.

Moving Image & Content, a minority and female-led creative agency, served as the lead agency of record for this program, providing creative direction, production, strategy, website design, and partnership management on the campaign. The Soze Agency, a social impact agency, led on community activation efforts, as well as curation and engagement of Team Sisterhood.

The #MarchforSisterhood debuts one year after the Girls Who Code Webby-award winning Sisterh>>d campaign in 2018, a digital visual album that reached nearly 100 million people worldwide. The album featured Girls Who Code alumni and prominent women artists and activists including Lizzo, Nigerian-American rapper Chika, and Club Mickey Mouse’s first rapper Regan Aliyah.

The #MarchForSisterhood was produced with generous support from Craig Newmark Philanthropies.

“Girls Who Code has impacted the lives of millions of girls around the world by equipping them with skills to thrive as leaders in tech and beyond,” said Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist and Craig Newmark Philanthropies, and Girls Who Code Board Member. “Today, the all-digital #MarchForSisterhood further empowered girls who are using tech to make grassroots changes in their communities.”

For updates and information on the #MarchForSisterhood, please visit www.marchforsisterhood.com.

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